Energy and Climate

ACCF is an internationally recognized economic authority on energy and environmental policy issues. The availability of abundant and affordable energy is of critical importance to economic growth, so U.S. policymakers should strive to create an environment that promotes sustained investment, increased efficiency, development of new technologies, and a predictable and rational regulatory system. 

News

Clean Capitalist Coalition Launches During National Clean Energy Week

"Unleashing the power of the free-market is the most effective and efficient way to address the challenges posed by climate change. We need to signal to the markets that investment in innovation and clean energy technologies is a win-win. I look forward to working together with the Clean Capitalist Coalition to promote policies that achieve this goal," said Drew Bond, senior fellow and director of energy innovation programs at ACCF.

ACCF September Salon: The Need for a National Energy Innovation Strategy

On September 27, the ACCF hosted an Economic Policy Salon, "The Need for a National Energy Innovation Strategy." Headlining the event were administration officials Melissa...

Retaliatory Tariffs Could Set Back America’s Energy Future

Real Clear Energy
Tariffs could pose real danger to the American energy renaissance that the president has worked hard to help nurture. If we really want “energy dominance” and if we really want to build the kind of energy security that will make America great for generations, we can’t afford setbacks to our energy future from a dangerous game of trade brinksmanship. Now is the time to reevaluate our approach to trade to ensure that retaliatory tariffs don’t undermine much needed economic momentum.

Research and Publications

Report: Tax Reform and Clean Energy R&D

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Brady-Ryan tax reform plan proposed last summer would decrease taxes on corporate profits and investment income, while preserving the existing credits for...

Impacts of Greenhouse Gas Regulations on the Industrial Sector

While the regulatory approach to reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the United States has largely focused on the power and transportation sectors, it’s clear that substantial reductions by the industrial sector would be needed to meet President Obama’s pledge under the Paris Agreement. This report by the ACCF Center for Policy Research and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Institute for 21st Century Energy summarizes a study conducted by NERA Economic Consulting on the potential impacts to the U.S. economy of regulating industrial sector GHG emissions.

The Rise Of China’s Civil Nuclear Program and Its Impact on...

Beijing’s civil nuclear program has made considerable growth in recent years. As early as 2000, China was considered a nuclear technology backwater with only three commercial reactors, compared to over 100 in the United States. Today, China has 35 reactors with 20 under construction. By 2030, it is projected to have 150 giga- watts of nuclear on line—roughly equivalent to Germany’s total capacity in electricity—while the U.S. nuclear fleet is expected to shrink by 20 percent or more. In little more than a decade, China could have twice the number of civilian reactors as the United States.