Energy and Climate

ACCF is an internationally recognized economic authority on energy and environmental policy issues. The availability of abundant and affordable energy is of critical importance to economic growth, so U.S. policymakers should strive to create an environment that promotes sustained investment, increased efficiency, development of new technologies, and a predictable and rational regulatory system. 

News

Finally, some fairness in global reporting of greenhouse gas

The Hill
A few weeks ago, the Trump administration scored a major diplomatic victory in international climate policy in the industrial city of Katowice, Poland. While this win won’t receive much attention in the headlines, Trump’s State Department achieved a decades-old foreign policy goal that helps protect U.S. manufacturing and levels the playing field against major economic competitors, particularly China.

DOE Domestic Uranium Enrichment Program Will Bolster U.S. National Security and...

The American Council for Capital Formation praised today’s Department of Energy announcement of a $115 million program to demonstrate technology for enriching uranium slightly...

Trump’s missed opportunity on coal and climate change

Axios
“I have long believed that the GOP position on the science undermines its ability to put forward a real climate policy,” said George David Banks, a former top adviser to Trump on these issues.

Research and Publications

Report: Tax Reform and Clean Energy R&D

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Brady-Ryan tax reform plan proposed last summer would decrease taxes on corporate profits and investment income, while preserving the existing credits for...

Impacts of Greenhouse Gas Regulations on the Industrial Sector

While the regulatory approach to reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the United States has largely focused on the power and transportation sectors, it’s clear that substantial reductions by the industrial sector would be needed to meet President Obama’s pledge under the Paris Agreement. This report by the ACCF Center for Policy Research and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Institute for 21st Century Energy summarizes a study conducted by NERA Economic Consulting on the potential impacts to the U.S. economy of regulating industrial sector GHG emissions.

The Rise Of China’s Civil Nuclear Program and Its Impact on...

Beijing’s civil nuclear program has made considerable growth in recent years. As early as 2000, China was considered a nuclear technology backwater with only three commercial reactors, compared to over 100 in the United States. Today, China has 35 reactors with 20 under construction. By 2030, it is projected to have 150 giga- watts of nuclear on line—roughly equivalent to Germany’s total capacity in electricity—while the U.S. nuclear fleet is expected to shrink by 20 percent or more. In little more than a decade, China could have twice the number of civilian reactors as the United States.