Energy and Climate

ACCF is an internationally recognized economic authority on energy and environmental policy issues. The availability of abundant and affordable energy is of critical importance to economic growth, so U.S. policymakers should strive to create an environment that promotes sustained investment, increased efficiency, development of new technologies, and a predictable and rational regulatory system. 

News

Ignoring free market principles will cost US solar jobs

Published in The Hill

As advocates of market-based polices, we believe that the solar industry works best when market forces are left to decide which companies flourish and which do not.

Tax reform can level the playing field in the energy market

Published in Washington Examiner

In the days, weeks and months ahead, policymakers should maintain their focus on permanent, comprehensive tax reform and remain committed to ensuring that no sectors of the economy are singled out for unfair treatment.

Op-Ed: No Easy Options For Perry On Nuclear Infrastructure

Published in Forbes

Mr. Perry must figure out how to sustain federal investment for key defense infrastructure that consumes nearly half of his department’s budget while also defending the White House’s proposed cuts to traditionally popular research and development programs. One issue Mr. Perry should consider promptly is the fact that the United States no longer has any domestic uranium enrichment capability. This is a gaping hole in the defense supply chain.

Research and Publications

Impacts of Greenhouse Gas Regulations on the Industrial Sector

While the regulatory approach to reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the United States has largely focused on the power and transportation sectors, it’s clear that substantial reductions by the industrial sector would be needed to meet President Obama’s pledge under the Paris Agreement. This report by the ACCF Center for Policy Research and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Institute for 21st Century Energy summarizes a study conducted by NERA Economic Consulting on the potential impacts to the U.S. economy of regulating industrial sector GHG emissions.

The Rise Of China’s Civil Nuclear Program and Its Impact on...

Beijing’s civil nuclear program has made considerable growth in recent years. As early as 2000, China was considered a nuclear technology backwater with only three commercial reactors, compared to over 100 in the United States. Today, China has 35 reactors with 20 under construction. By 2030, it is projected to have 150 giga- watts of nuclear on line—roughly equivalent to Germany’s total capacity in electricity—while the U.S. nuclear fleet is expected to shrink by 20 percent or more. In little more than a decade, China could have twice the number of civilian reactors as the United States.

The U.S.-Republic of Korea Nuclear Relationship – An Indispensable Alliance

With the decline of its own civil nuclear program, the United States needs ROK’s nuclear prowess to strengthen its own market position and help uphold its nonproliferation and safety goals, especially with the looming threat of a Chinese commercial nuclear monopoly. Furthermore, the ROK provides the United States with additional foreign commercial opportunities and critical added investment.